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About Seán

Seán graduated from Trinity College Dublin with a BA in Natural Science before continuing his studies in the field of Supramolecular Chemistry, completing his PhD at the Melville Laboratory for Polymer Synthesis, University of Cambridge.

During this time, he undertook numerous visiting researcher positions around the world at Northwestern University, Jacob's University Bremen, Tsinghua University and the Jawaharlal Nehru Centre for Advanced Scientific Research.

Following his studies he completed postdoctoral research associateships at the Cavendish laboratory, University of Cambridge and the Molecular Sciences Research Hub, Imperial College London. His research focused on DNA-mediated assembly of optoelectronic chromophore stacks and investigation of their ultrafast dynamics by transient spectroscopy and the synthesis of novel, chiral organic semiconductors and their application to spintronic devices.

In 2022 Seán joined the Keltie Team  and is training to become a qualified patent attorney. Since joining Keltie, Seán has worked in the Life Sciences Team dealing with a range of subject matter in the fields of chemistry, biology, materials and medical devices. As part of his role he is working with a range of clients from start-ups to SMEs and multinational corporations.

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MoreWhat is pharmacogenomics and how is it being implemented in medicine?

20.07.2022

What is pharmacogenomics and how is it being implemented in medicine?

Scientists have the technology to precisely match treatments to people’s genetic codes, paving the way for a new era of medicine.

MoreScientists Complete The Human Genome Sequence

08.04.2022

Scientists Complete The Human Genome Sequence

The human genome sequence is complete, twenty years after the first draft. Scientists have fully mapped the human genome sequence and released their findings almost 40 years after the Human Genome Project was first announced. Initially revealed in 2003, the DNA blueprint for human life included most of the regions that code for proteins but left out 200 million bases. Now, scientists have mapped a complete sequence, making this a significant development in the field of genomics.

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