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About Andrew

Andy completed an undergraduate degree in Genetics at the University of Liverpool, graduating in 2014. Following his undergraduate studies, he completed a master's degree in Applied Biosciences and Biotechnology at Imperial College London in 2015, where he studied a wide variety of technical areas including: plant biotechnology, industrial and pharmaceutical biotechnology, genetics, genomics and synthetic biology.

He followed these studies with a PhD at the University of Cambridge (2015-2019), where he investigated vitamin B12 transport in algae and gained experience in algal molecular biology and bioinformatic analysis. During this period he also spent 3 months working at a biomedical device start-up company in a data science role, gaining further exposure to computational research and commercial environments.

 

After his PhD, he continued working at the University of Cambridge as a postdoctoral research associate, investigating the importance of vitamin exchange between hot spring community members using metagenomic data.

 

Andy joined Keltie in 2021, and is working towards becoming a qualified patent attorney. He works in the Chemical and Life Sciences team, where he supports clients working in areas including: industrial biotechnology, biofuels, sustainability, medical devices and bioinformatics.

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Ten differences between UK and EU registered designs

Since Brexit, EU registered design protection no longer covers the UK. As a result, many design owners and IP practitioners have found themselves filing UK designs for the first time. Are you up to speed on UK practice? Here's a quick-glance guide to the key differences between the EU and UK design systems...

MoreThe Electric Vehicle Industry: The Next Big Challenges

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The Electric Vehicle Industry: The Next Big Challenges

According to the Electric Vehicles and Infrastructure Report, The UK’s transport sector is responsible for 27% of the UK’s total greenhouse emissions, with cars contributing up to 55% of those emissions. This has led to the automotive industry becoming a target for reducing emissions to make sure that we, along with the rest of the world, achieve net-zero by 2050.

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